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Soy Sauces + Fish Sauces

Salty, dark and delicious: soy sauce and fish sauce are indispensable ingredients in many Asian recipes. They often give a dish exactly the kick it needs to taste truly authentic. There is not just one soy sauce or fish sauce. In different countries, manufacturers often rely on traditional brewing methods that best suit the taste of the respective national cuisine. Whether light or dark soy sauce, sweet or mushroom-based, fish or oyster sauce: at looddl you will find the right seasoning for your recipe. Discover our range!

Tasty sauces with common roots

While soy sauce is particularly popular today in East Asia, i.e. China, Japan and Korea, chefs in South East Asia, i.e. Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam, etc., prefer to use fish sauce for their dishes. Both sauces have the same origin. Around 2300 years ago, a fermented sauce based on soy and fish was brewed in China. Later, the two ingredients diverged and soy sauce was made from soybeans and grain as well as a koji starter culture and salt.

Good fish sauce relies solely on fish, usually anchovies, table salt and pressure. Both sauces have to mature for several months, fish sauce between 8 and 18 months, soy sauce ferments for 6 to 12 months. They are also excellent sources of protein and can be a healthier alternative to salt thanks to their umami taste. But what makes the taste so unique?

Soy sauce is popular all over the world and is considered the most widely consumed soy product. Here in Switzerland, many people will be familiar with Kikkoman dark soy sauce, a Japanese classic that is often served with sushi. Soy sauce has a spicy umami flavor, is more or less salty depending on the preparation and is very suitable for:

  • Marinades
  • Dips
  • Wok dishes
  • Soups

Fish sauce is characterized by a salty umami taste, which is complemented by a sweet note, especially in Thai production. Despite the name and the basic ingredient, the spicy sauce does not taste like fish after cooking, but supports the other ingredients and provides a deeper taste experience for meat and vegetables alike. The slightly reddish liquid is best stored in a dark and cool place. However, it can also be kept outside the fridge for at least a year and up to 2 years. In East Asia, locally produced fish sauce is usually used as it is adapted to the most popular dishes. The seasoning is particularly suitable for:

  • Thailand curries
  • Marinades
  • Dressing for lukewarm Vietnamese salads
  • Dips and homemade sauces

Soy sauce: it makes all the difference

Tasty soy sauce for a perfectly rounded taste comes in many variations. They can be distinguished by their country of origin, color and taste. In addition to the well-known Japanese soy sauce, Shōyu, there is Chinese soy sauce Jiàngyóu, which is usually a little saltier, and Korean soy sauce, Ganjang. We explain the difference so that you can choose the right soy sauce for your favorite recipes.

Chinese jiàngyóu

In contrast to the Japanese version, no wheat is used for jiàngyóu, or only up to 30%. This corresponds to the original recipe of the earliest soy sauces. The slight sweetness that would come from the fermented wheat is partly added later with sugar, according to taste. In general, Chinese soy sauce is somewhat saltier than other varieties, probably also because the fermentation process is somewhat shorter at 1 to 6 months. There are three types, depending on the length of fermentation: first creation, young creation and older creation. In China, a distinction is also made between light and dark soy sauces.

Japanese soy sauces

Soy sauce is as much a part of Japan as sushi, ramen and Dashi. The traditional honjozo method for Japanese shōyu involves roasted wheat and steamed soybeans. The addition of koji mold leads to fermentation. Moromi is a solution that is fermented over several months. Salt is added to ensure that it remains stable. Soy masters then pasteurize and filter the mixture and fill it directly into bottles or age it further. The different varieties vary in color, aroma, taste and quality. As with good olive oil, the first filtration is the best quality, the second contains less flavor and good amino acids. Apart from this, there are four different types.

Dark soy sauce (Koikuchi Shōyu)

The best-selling soy sauce in Japan comes from the breweries around Tokyo. It is mildly salty, but has a lot of umami. It gets its dark color from a long fermentation process of soy and wheat in equal parts. It is the classic sauce for sushi, but also goes perfectly with fried dishes, Japanese curry with vegetables or grilled fish.

Light soy sauce (Usukuchi Shōyu)

Light-colored soy sauce is popular around the old capital of Kyoto in the Kansai region. It has a higher salt content, which slows down the fermentation process. As a result, the sauce is not only lighter in color, but also less intense and spicy. It is particularly suitable for light soups that need to retain their delicate color. Dishes from the region, such as ibuki soba or himeji oden, also use the light-colored sauce. The Shiro variation goes one step further and uses far fewer soybeans in relation to wheat than usual. This sauce is used almost exclusively in Japan. It is used in haut cuisine to make ingredients look appealing or for preserving.

Gluten-free soy sauce (tamari)

Tamari is the closest thing to the traditional Japanese soy sauce recipe, as it does not use wheat. The dark sauce is therefore perfect for people who are less tolerant to gluten but would like to dip their sushi in soy sauce.

Sweet soy sauce (Amakuchi Shōyu)

Less widespread is this variant from Kyūshū, which is known for its sweet dishes. The sweetened soy sauce is used as a tasty glaze for rice cakes on a stick, for example. Unlike teriyaki, it does not contain mirin or sake.


Want to buy soy sauce? At looddl you will find the best dark and light soy sauces and similar products such as ponzu or teriyaki sauce. In the Japanese food section, you'll find everything you need for your Japanese cuisine.


Korean ganjang

In Korea, soy sauce is either fermented according to the same principle as in Japan, or on the basis of soy blocks that are infused with the starter culture. Another difference is the distinction between normal ganjang and guk ganjang, the latter being lighter and more complex in taste and aroma. It is therefore used for more elaborate dishes such as complex stews or namul. Manufacturers in Korea specify the quality levels of their "normal" ganjang sauces in four categories:

  • Naturally brewed (Yango Ganjang): The ingredients can vary. normal or defatted soybeans are mixed with wheat or rice and a mold or yeast culture. Fermentation takes about six months. This variant produces the highest quality.
  • Mixed soy sauce (Honhap Ganjang): Here, a naturally used soy sauce is mixed with an acid hydrolyzed soy sauce.
  • Acid hydrolyzed soy sauce: In a rapid process, the amino acids are broken down from the proteins using hydrochloric acid. Flavor enhancers are used here to create the desired flavor. This variant is usually found in ready-made products.
  • Aromatized soy sauce (Mat Ganjang): This type has an additional aroma of mushrooms, garlic or apples, for example. The label on the bottle indicates whether the sauce is intended for braising or frying.

If you want to bring Korean dishes to the table, you definitely need soybean paste as well as ganjang, Doenjang, and red chili paste, Gochujang. The fermented pastes serve as a base for many dishes and conjure up a great taste in sauces and soups. Even classic ready-made noodles can be upgraded from a snack to a meal with a little seasoning and fresh vegetables.


Fish sauces: particularly popular in Southeast Asian cuisine

The production of fish sauce varies from country to country, as with soy sauce. The main differences are the ingredients and the fermentation time, which results in different flavor profiles and qualities. Whether traditionally or industrially produced, it is best to buy fish sauce from the country whose cuisine you are cooking according to in order to bring the truly authentic taste and perfect aroma to the table. You can use this overview as a guide when making your selection:

Indonesia

Indonesian fish sauce, known as kecap ikan or terasi, can vary depending on the region and production method. An interesting feature of Indonesian fish sauce is the use of shrimp paste (terasi) in some varieties, which results in a complex flavor profile. For example, when cooking nasi goreng, gado-gado or sambal goreng udang, you can give your sauces a particularly rich depth by adding fish sauce.

Cambodia

In Cambodia, fish sauce is called tuk trey. Here, fish is often fermented with salt and sometimes sugar. Cambodian fish sauce can be somewhat thicker and often has a strong umami flavor. Dishes such as Lap Khmer, Bai Sach Chrouk or Amok are traditionally refined with fish sauce.

Philippines

In the Philippines, fish sauce is known as "patis". Anchovies are often used here. It can be easy to make by salting and fermenting fish. Patis is often used as a dip or condiment. However, soy sauce and shrimp paste are also popular seasonings in the Philippines.

Thailand

Fish sauce is known as nam pla in Thailand. Traditional production involves fermenting small fish species such as anchovies or mackerel together with salt. The mixture is stored in barrels and fermented for months to years. Thai fish sauce is known for its salty taste and sweet undertones. When cooking, it goes perfectly with a creamy Thai curry.

Vietnam

In Vietnam, fish sauce is called Nước mắm. Anchovies are often used here. The fermentation time can be shorter than in other countries, resulting in a lighter color and a milder taste and smell. Nước mắm is often used in Vietnamese cuisine to flavor a variety of dishes. It is very popular as a dip with garlic, lemon and chilli, for example, or as a dressing for refreshing bun cha.

Oyster sauce vs. fish sauce

You can also find oyster sauce in our range. Our tip: buy these products in addition to fish sauce, not as a substitute. This delicious condiment has completely different properties. The consistency is rather thick, as the sauce made from oysters or oyster extract is often sweetened with sugar. This gives it a predominantly sweet taste with a slightly salty undertone. There is also a hint of umami. You can therefore season more generously with oyster sauce than with the intense fish sauce. It is also ideal for thickening soups and sauces. It is also popular for fried rice or chow mein, broccoli with garlic or meat dishes.

Discover the wonderful world of sauces at looddl

In the looddl Asia Shop you will find online Asian food to suit your taste. Our large selection offers you exactly the ingredients you need for your favorite dishes. Our many years of experience as a supplier to Asian restaurants throughout Switzerland is your advantage: we have direct connections to the producers and can deliver fresh produce and special treasures directly to your home. No lugging around, no long trips to the nearest big city. looddl is your practical point of contact for all Asian food. We deliver orders placed before 3 pm within 2 days - even frozen goods and fresh meat and vegetables will arrive safely. Order your groceries now and cook your favorite dish soon! Fancy a bargain? Then take a look at our special offers .

Do you need inspiration on what dishes you can prepare with your soy sauce or fish sauce? Then take a look at our constantly growing recipe collection!

  • DP Soy Sauce - 1l

    CHF 7.95
  • DP Toyomansi (Soy Sauce with Calamansi) - 750ml

    CHF 8.95
  • Ganjang DASIMA (Korean Kelp Soy Sauce) - 840ml

    CHF 7.95
  • Ganjang GUK (Korean Soy Sauce for Soup) - 1.7l

    CHF 16.95
  • Ganjang GUK (Korean Soy Sauce for Soup) - 840ml

    CHF 8.50
  • Ganjang JIN (Korean Soy Sauce) - 1.7l

    CHF 14.50
  • Ganjang JIN (Korean Soy Sauce) - 840ml

    CHF 7.50
  • Ganjang JIN (Korean Soy Sauce, Economy) - 15l

    CHF 55.00
  • Ganjang JIN (Korean Soy Sauce, Premium) - 15l

    CHF 55.00
  • Ganjang YANGJO (Korean Premium Soy Sauce) - 1.7l

    CHF 17.50
  • Ganjang YANGJO (Korean Premium Soy Sauce) - 840ml

    CHF 8.95
  • HB Thai Light Soy Sauce - 700ml

    CHF 7.50
  • HB Thai Mushroom Soy Sauce - 700ml

    CHF 8.95
  • HB Thai Sweet Soy Sauce - 700ml

    CHF 7.95
  • LKK Premium Oyster Sauce - 510g

    CHF 8.95
  • LKK Supreme Mushroom Dark Soy Sauce - 500ml

    CHF 5.95
Salty, dark and delicious: soy sauce and fish sauce are indispensable ingredients in many Asian recipes. They often give a dish exactly the kick it needs to taste truly authentic. There is not just one soy sauce or fish sauce. In different countries, manufacturers often rely on traditional brewing methods that best suit the taste of the respective national cuisine. Whether light or dark soy sauce, sweet or mushroom-based, fish or oyster sauce: at looddl you will find the right seasoning for your recipe. Discover our range!

Tasty sauces with common roots

While soy sauce is particularly popular today in East Asia, i.e. China, Japan and Korea, chefs in South East Asia, i.e. Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam, etc., prefer to use fish sauce for their dishes. Both sauces have the same origin. Around 2300 years ago, a fermented sauce based on soy and fish was brewed in China. Later, the two ingredients diverged and soy sauce was made from soybeans and grain as well as a koji starter culture and salt.

Good fish sauce relies solely on fish, usually anchovies, table salt and pressure. Both sauces have to mature for several months, fish sauce between 8 and 18 months, soy sauce ferments for 6 to 12 months. They are also excellent sources of protein and can be a healthier alternative to salt thanks to their umami taste. But what makes the taste so unique?

Soy sauce is popular all over the world and is considered the most widely consumed soy product. Here in Switzerland, many people will be familiar with Kikkoman dark soy sauce, a Japanese classic that is often served with sushi. Soy sauce has a spicy umami flavor, is more or less salty depending on the preparation and is very suitable for:

  • Marinades
  • Dips
  • Wok dishes
  • Soups

Fish sauce is characterized by a salty umami taste, which is complemented by a sweet note, especially in Thai production. Despite the name and the basic ingredient, the spicy sauce does not taste like fish after cooking, but supports the other ingredients and provides a deeper taste experience for meat and vegetables alike. The slightly reddish liquid is best stored in a dark and cool place. However, it can also be kept outside the fridge for at least a year and up to 2 years. In East Asia, locally produced fish sauce is usually used as it is adapted to the most popular dishes. The seasoning is particularly suitable for:

  • Thailand curries
  • Marinades
  • Dressing for lukewarm Vietnamese salads
  • Dips and homemade sauces

Soy sauce: it makes all the difference

Tasty soy sauce for a perfectly rounded taste comes in many variations. They can be distinguished by their country of origin, color and taste. In addition to the well-known Japanese soy sauce, Shōyu, there is Chinese soy sauce Jiàngyóu, which is usually a little saltier, and Korean soy sauce, Ganjang. We explain the difference so that you can choose the right soy sauce for your favorite recipes.

Chinese jiàngyóu

In contrast to the Japanese version, no wheat is used for jiàngyóu, or only up to 30%. This corresponds to the original recipe of the earliest soy sauces. The slight sweetness that would come from the fermented wheat is partly added later with sugar, according to taste. In general, Chinese soy sauce is somewhat saltier than other varieties, probably also because the fermentation process is somewhat shorter at 1 to 6 months. There are three types, depending on the length of fermentation: first creation, young creation and older creation. In China, a distinction is also made between light and dark soy sauces.

Japanese soy sauces

Soy sauce is as much a part of Japan as sushi, ramen and Dashi. The traditional honjozo method for Japanese shōyu involves roasted wheat and steamed soybeans. The addition of koji mold leads to fermentation. Moromi is a solution that is fermented over several months. Salt is added to ensure that it remains stable. Soy masters then pasteurize and filter the mixture and fill it directly into bottles or age it further. The different varieties vary in color, aroma, taste and quality. As with good olive oil, the first filtration is the best quality, the second contains less flavor and good amino acids. Apart from this, there are four different types.

Dark soy sauce (Koikuchi Shōyu)

The best-selling soy sauce in Japan comes from the breweries around Tokyo. It is mildly salty, but has a lot of umami. It gets its dark color from a long fermentation process of soy and wheat in equal parts. It is the classic sauce for sushi, but also goes perfectly with fried dishes, Japanese curry with vegetables or grilled fish.

Light soy sauce (Usukuchi Shōyu)

Light-colored soy sauce is popular around the old capital of Kyoto in the Kansai region. It has a higher salt content, which slows down the fermentation process. As a result, the sauce is not only lighter in color, but also less intense and spicy. It is particularly suitable for light soups that need to retain their delicate color. Dishes from the region, such as ibuki soba or himeji oden, also use the light-colored sauce. The Shiro variation goes one step further and uses far fewer soybeans in relation to wheat than usual. This sauce is used almost exclusively in Japan. It is used in haut cuisine to make ingredients look appealing or for preserving.

Gluten-free soy sauce (tamari)

Tamari is the closest thing to the traditional Japanese soy sauce recipe, as it does not use wheat. The dark sauce is therefore perfect for people who are less tolerant to gluten but would like to dip their sushi in soy sauce.

Sweet soy sauce (Amakuchi Shōyu)

Less widespread is this variant from Kyūshū, which is known for its sweet dishes. The sweetened soy sauce is used as a tasty glaze for rice cakes on a stick, for example. Unlike teriyaki, it does not contain mirin or sake.


Want to buy soy sauce? At looddl you will find the best dark and light soy sauces and similar products such as ponzu or teriyaki sauce. In the Japanese food section, you'll find everything you need for your Japanese cuisine.


Korean ganjang

In Korea, soy sauce is either fermented according to the same principle as in Japan, or on the basis of soy blocks that are infused with the starter culture. Another difference is the distinction between normal ganjang and guk ganjang, the latter being lighter and more complex in taste and aroma. It is therefore used for more elaborate dishes such as complex stews or namul. Manufacturers in Korea specify the quality levels of their "normal" ganjang sauces in four categories:

  • Naturally brewed (Yango Ganjang): The ingredients can vary. normal or defatted soybeans are mixed with wheat or rice and a mold or yeast culture. Fermentation takes about six months. This variant produces the highest quality.
  • Mixed soy sauce (Honhap Ganjang): Here, a naturally used soy sauce is mixed with an acid hydrolyzed soy sauce.
  • Acid hydrolyzed soy sauce: In a rapid process, the amino acids are broken down from the proteins using hydrochloric acid. Flavor enhancers are used here to create the desired flavor. This variant is usually found in ready-made products.
  • Aromatized soy sauce (Mat Ganjang): This type has an additional aroma of mushrooms, garlic or apples, for example. The label on the bottle indicates whether the sauce is intended for braising or frying.

If you want to bring Korean dishes to the table, you definitely need soybean paste as well as ganjang, Doenjang, and red chili paste, Gochujang. The fermented pastes serve as a base for many dishes and conjure up a great taste in sauces and soups. Even classic ready-made noodles can be upgraded from a snack to a meal with a little seasoning and fresh vegetables.


Fish sauces: particularly popular in Southeast Asian cuisine

The production of fish sauce varies from country to country, as with soy sauce. The main differences are the ingredients and the fermentation time, which results in different flavor profiles and qualities. Whether traditionally or industrially produced, it is best to buy fish sauce from the country whose cuisine you are cooking according to in order to bring the truly authentic taste and perfect aroma to the table. You can use this overview as a guide when making your selection:

Indonesia

Indonesian fish sauce, known as kecap ikan or terasi, can vary depending on the region and production method. An interesting feature of Indonesian fish sauce is the use of shrimp paste (terasi) in some varieties, which results in a complex flavor profile. For example, when cooking nasi goreng, gado-gado or sambal goreng udang, you can give your sauces a particularly rich depth by adding fish sauce.

Cambodia

In Cambodia, fish sauce is called tuk trey. Here, fish is often fermented with salt and sometimes sugar. Cambodian fish sauce can be somewhat thicker and often has a strong umami flavor. Dishes such as Lap Khmer, Bai Sach Chrouk or Amok are traditionally refined with fish sauce.

Philippines

In the Philippines, fish sauce is known as "patis". Anchovies are often used here. It can be easy to make by salting and fermenting fish. Patis is often used as a dip or condiment. However, soy sauce and shrimp paste are also popular seasonings in the Philippines.

Thailand

Fish sauce is known as nam pla in Thailand. Traditional production involves fermenting small fish species such as anchovies or mackerel together with salt. The mixture is stored in barrels and fermented for months to years. Thai fish sauce is known for its salty taste and sweet undertones. When cooking, it goes perfectly with a creamy Thai curry.

Vietnam

In Vietnam, fish sauce is called Nước mắm. Anchovies are often used here. The fermentation time can be shorter than in other countries, resulting in a lighter color and a milder taste and smell. Nước mắm is often used in Vietnamese cuisine to flavor a variety of dishes. It is very popular as a dip with garlic, lemon and chilli, for example, or as a dressing for refreshing bun cha.

Oyster sauce vs. fish sauce

You can also find oyster sauce in our range. Our tip: buy these products in addition to fish sauce, not as a substitute. This delicious condiment has completely different properties. The consistency is rather thick, as the sauce made from oysters or oyster extract is often sweetened with sugar. This gives it a predominantly sweet taste with a slightly salty undertone. There is also a hint of umami. You can therefore season more generously with oyster sauce than with the intense fish sauce. It is also ideal for thickening soups and sauces. It is also popular for fried rice or chow mein, broccoli with garlic or meat dishes.

Discover the wonderful world of sauces at looddl

In the looddl Asia Shop you will find online Asian food to suit your taste. Our large selection offers you exactly the ingredients you need for your favorite dishes. Our many years of experience as a supplier to Asian restaurants throughout Switzerland is your advantage: we have direct connections to the producers and can deliver fresh produce and special treasures directly to your home. No lugging around, no long trips to the nearest big city. looddl is your practical point of contact for all Asian food. We deliver orders placed before 3 pm within 2 days - even frozen goods and fresh meat and vegetables will arrive safely. Order your groceries now and cook your favorite dish soon! Fancy a bargain? Then take a look at our special offers .

Do you need inspiration on what dishes you can prepare with your soy sauce or fish sauce? Then take a look at our constantly growing recipe collection!